Theatre Review – Score

Score is a bravely authentic ‘in your face’ piece of theatre, inspired by real-life accounts of parents using Bournemouth’s drug treatment service.

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Photo credit – Photo from Score by Kitty Wheeler Shaw

When entering The Wardrobe Theatre, the stage was littered with the paraphernalia of children’s play – dusted with the ambience of dirty chaos. In the centre of the stage the two performers sat, seemingly nervous and mistrustful of the audience as they filled up the seats. Yet as soon as the play began the characters Hannah (Kathleen Fitzpatrick Milton) and Kirsty (Lara Simpson) commanded the theatre revealing the masters that they are.

Score is a beautifully poignant illustration of enduring friendship, trudging through self-destruction and back to recovery repeatedly.

Be prepared for an emotional roller-coaster, sit down, buckle up and enjoy the ride. One minute I was giggling to myself at the childhood rapture of a fantasy world, the next I was literally crossing my legs as we were taken on a journey of seamless transition from child, to mother in labour in a heartbeat. Kathleen’s emotional shifts while singing ‘Never Ever’ by the All Saints, through gritted teeth as her baby was being born was truly genius. I challenge any woman who has given birth not to clench their thighs together through that performance.

The stage is cleverly planted with a few well-placed props that enable Hannah and Kirsty to change scenes and characters effortlessly. All that’s needed to take the story to starkly different time and place are minimal sound effects and light changes.

Every Time Kathleen and Kirsty sang acapella, goose bumps scattered over my skin and the blood in my veins raced a little faster. Their voices infiltrated every tiny particle of the theatre and permeated the pores of each and every audience member. Each word of Lucy Bell’s script carries weight, no time is wasted in this hour long performance. The juxtaposition of comedy and gut wrenching sadness keeps the audience on the edge of their seats. It’s rare to witness such finely crafted theatre, both the writing and performances were a masterpiece in craft.

Go and see it at the Wardrobe before it’s gone.

Score runs at The Wardrobe Theatre until 23rd April

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